The much-awaited new poetry anthology 100 Great Indian Poems is finally published (by Bloomsbury) and ready for orders. The poems were selected from the Indian poetry written over 3000 years in 27 languages. From Punjabi, my poem “Kalli” is included along with Surjit Patar’s “My Poem”. A poem by Amrita Pritam, could not be included because of copyright issues. Another poet of Punjabi origin, Gulzar, is also included though he doesn’t write in Punjabi. The anthology is in English and includes selections from the Vedas and the Upanishads and several other classics. The 100 poets include Kalidasa, Mirza Ghalib, Mir Taqi Mir, Rabindranath Tagore, Kabir, Amir Khusrau, Mirabai, Jayanta Mahapatra, Kunwar Narain, Dilip Chitre, Mangalesh Dabral, Keki Daruwalla, K. Satchidanandan, Namdeo Dhasal and other modern poets including Abhay k. who is also the editor of the anthology -salute to Abhay’s monumental undertaking. The anthology is already on the best-seller list of It’s not yet available outside India.

“Abhay K. Is a master anthologist who is superb at picking accessible poems that will reach the general reader.”- Nicholas Birns, New York University.

“This is a new ratnamala -a treasury of gems -of Indian poems from across the centuries. A delight.” Rachel Dayer, University of London.

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Canada’s founder of Punjabi theatre

September 11th, 2017

Punjabi-born Ajmer Rode is a founding member of several Indo-Canadian literary and performing arts associations. He has written, directed and acted in plays of Punjabi theatre, and has published books in India and Canada, in Punjabi and English.  He is regarded as the founder of Punjabi theatre in Canada. He has also attracted attention in the U.S. with his poem Stroll in a Particle, which is one of the eight international poems inscribed on a public wall outside the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation building in Seattle. His collection of poetry, Poems at My Doorstep originally published in 1990 has been re-issued by Ekstasis this year. $23.95 ISBN 978-1-77171-233-0

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Book shop in vegetable Market
ਪਟਿਆਲੇ ਅਰਬਨ ਅਸਟੇਟ ਵਿਚ ਸਬਜ਼ੀ ਖਰੀਦ ਦਿਆਂ ਕਿਤਾਬਾਂ ਦੀ ਦੁਕਾਨ ਦੇਖ ਮੈਂ ਦੰਗ ਰਹਿ ਗਿਆ।
ਕਾਊਂਟਰ ਤੇ ਖੜ੍ਹੇ ਕੁੜੀਆਂ ਮੁੰਡਿਆਂ ਨੇ ਦੱਸਿਆ ਕਿ ਉਹ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਯੂਨੀਵਰਸਿਟੀ ਵਿਚ ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਵਿਭਾਗ ਦੇ ਵਿਦਿਆਰਥੀ ਹਨ।
ਕਿਤਾਬਾਂ ਲੋਕਾਂ ਤੱਕ ਲੈ ਕੇ ਜਾਣ ਦਾ ਇਹ ਵਧੀਆ ਯਤਨ ਹੈ।
ਹੋਰਨਾਂ ਵਿਦਿਆਰਥੀਆਂ ਨੂੰ ਵੀ ਆਪੋ ਆਪਣੇ ਇਲਾਕੇ ਵਿਚ ਇਹੋ ਜਿਹੇ ਯਤਨ ਕਰਨੇ ਚਾਹੀਦੇ ਹਨ
ਬਰਜਿੰਦਰ ਨਸਰਾਲੀ



Dr. M.B. Gaijan Head, Department of English Samaldas Arts College, Shri M. K. Bhavnagar University Bhavnagar, Gujarat

Abstract: In 20th century Canada remained multicultural fascination world for the world community due to liberal immigration policy, multicultural, multilingual social acceptability. As a result humanity all over the world preferred to accept Canada as their “Dream Land”. Thus, Canada emerged as the rainbow-coloured nation. Indians have also preferred Canada as their “Dream Land”. Thus Canada becomes “Second Home” for the large number of Punjabis, Jains, Marathis and Gujaratis. These Indians couldn’t forget their homeland, culture, and their roots. By their literary works they paint their “roots”, “India”, “culture”. Among all Indo-Canadian writers, Ajmer Rode’s contribution is indeed remarkable. He is a playwright, director, translator and poet. He is writing in Punjabi as well as in English. Because of his unique contribution he is awarded by the State Government of Punjab. He is also a leading poet of Canada. Being a Punjabi, his poems remain highly significant to understand Indian’s culture. In the final text of this paper Ajmer Rode’s selected poems are considered for the study. For full article go to the link below.



When Navtej Bharati and I saw Om Puri in 1999 in his Mumbai apartment he lived with writer Nandita Puri and their son Ishaan. And a dog that was blind. Om said he picked up the dog when it was a blind puppy abandoned by his mother on this very apartment street; we raised him along with Ishaan, he said. The little story was so moving, said so much more about the great actor.

And those who met Puri know he was a Punjabi in and out. When we presented him a copy of our newly published book Leela he immediately opened it and read a poem to three of us, including Nandita who being a Bengali merely smiled. (The picture was taken by Shahzad N Khan,  Vancouver, 2010)